Welcome!

Our group, in the Department of Geoscience at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, currently consists of Dr. Pamela Burnley, Dr. Sylvia-Monique Thomas, and their graduate and undergraduate students.

Top from left to right: Kathryn Wilson, Katie Peterson, Sylvia-Monique Thomas, Tim Bright, Rick Rowland, and Evan Mohr. Bottom from left to right: Christopher Cline, Pamela Burnley, and Brandon Guttery.


Introduction

Christopher Cline seen through the D-DIA the Brookhaven National Laboratory, National Synchrotron Light Source.

We use high-pressure experimentation, in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy for analysis of samples, as well as numerical modeling. In combination, these research tools allow us to better understand the grain-scale processes that control the large-scale mechanical behavior of Earth's materials including those exhibited in mantle convection and earthquakes. Currently we are working on quartz and olivine deformation using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, elastic-plastic self-consistent modeling of plastic deformation and finite element modeling of stress and plastic strain distribution in polycrystals during deformation .


Research Tools > Numerical Modeling > EPSC Modeling

Elastic-Plastic Self-Consistent Modeling

We use Elastic-Plastic Self-Consistent (EPSC) modeling to interpret the diffraction data collected with the D-DIA apparatus.

In particular we the EPSC Model of Turner and Tome (1994). Elastic-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) models consider the elastic and plastic behavior of a polycrystal by examining the behavior of large numbers of individual grains. Each grain is treated as an elliptical inclusion within an infinite homogeneous matrix, which in turn, has the average properties of all of the grains in the polycrystal. Each grain is described by its orientations, its single crystal elastic tensor and possible slip systems, each with its own critical resolved shear stress (CRSS).

An increment of strain is applied to the homogenous matrix that transmits stress to the grain. The grain responds elastically or plastically depending on its orientation and the CRSS of its slip systems, while also fulfilling compatibility criteria. The behavior of the homogenous matrix is the sum of the behaviors of the remainder of the grains and must be recalculated after each grain is deformed. Thus the model iterates until it converges for each deformation step. Work hardening may also be included in the model.

Model output includes stresses and strains for each grain as well as average stress and elastic strains for populations of grains that contribute to various diffraction peaks. The macroscopic stress and strain for the aggregate are also calculated. Therefore, model results can be directly compared with diffraction results.

Research Tools > Numerical Modeling > FE Modeling

Finite Element Modeling of Microstresses

Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is a powerful engineering tool that is used to predict mechanical and thermal behavior of materials at a wide range of scales. We have used FEM to model sample assembly parts and the mechanical behavior of fluid inclusions in minerals. Most recently we have been using FEM models to understand the distribution of stress and elastic strain in deforming polycrystalline materials.

Stress Percolation in Polycrystalline Materials

Using FEM models of polycrystalline materials with a range of elastic and plastic properties. We have realized that stress transmission in polycrystals is essentially a percolation problem. Perhaps this should not be a surprise because a polycrystal is fundamentally a disordered system and percolation is a phenomenon that occurs in disordered systems. You can learn more about our work on stress percolation by reading Pamela’s recent paper in Nature Communications.

Fluid Inclusion Studies

We were able to match the observed expansions with models whose shape and aspect ratios are the same as those observed for the inclusion. (Burnley & Schmidt 2006)

Inclusions within mineral grains are nearly ubiquitous in rocks of all types. Whether they are crystalline, glass, fluid, or gas, inclusions contain information about either the environment of formation of the host mineral grain or in the case of secondary fluid inclusions, conditions since the mineral grain was formed. If the temperature or pressure changes after the inclusion-host system forms, differences in thermal expansion or compressibility between the two will create differential stresses in the host and may cause it to permanently deform. In many situations, understanding the mechanics of the inclusion-host system is helpful for interpreting measurements made on the inclusion.

For the fluid inclusion experiments shown below, Pamela, working with Christian Schmidt, used a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC).

To measure the volume change of fluid inclusions in response to changes in internal pressure, we used MSC. MARC/Mentat, to create and analyze two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) finite element models of fluid inclusions. All 3D model shapes have orthogonal symmetry.

We used FEM to look at the stresses that cause fluid inclusions to decrepitate when they are heated. We made a 2D model of a fluid inclusion. We found that the stress concentrated at the corners of the inclusion and the biggest stress concentrations in the long direction around the corners from which the cracks in the real inclusion radiated.

The Group > Graduate Work



Graduate Student Projects

Experimental deformation of quartz at high temperature and pressure

Experimental deformation of olivine and high temperature and pressure

Microstructural studies of deformed olivine and quartz

Shock studies of the brittle deformation at extreme pressures

We have full RA funding available.

Research Tools >Griggs Machine

Griggs Machine

Students Shereena Dyer and Mai Sas by Pamela's Griggs Machine.

The Griggs machine works by forcing a cylindrical piston into a cylindrical hole in a pressure vessel (also known as a "bomb"). The pressure piston contains a second, smaller piston that can move independently (driven by the gear train at the top of the press) which allows the sample to be deformed.

The bomb for the Griggs Machine.

The sample assembly for the Griggs Machine consists of a series of nested cylinders. The outermost cylinders consist of soft materials (salt and pyrophyllite) that transmit the confining pressure to the sample. Within them there is a cylindrical graphite furnace and more soft confining media.

Pistons used with the Griggs Machine.

The sample sits at the center. Above and below the sample are hard alumina pistons that are used to transmit the stress to the sample. A thermocouple monitors the temperature at the sample. The diagram below shows the sample assembly design Pamela used while working on her PhD with Harry Green.


Diagram showing a sample assembly for the Griggs machine.

Chris Turner and Beth Lavoie at Georgia State University displaying our first successful piece of pressed salt.

Research Focus Areas > High Pressure Experimentation

High Pressure Experimentation

The pressures found in Earth's interior can be achieved in the laboratory using a wide variety of experimental devices ranging from cold seal bombs, which work something like a pressure cooker, to shock guns that fire puck shaped projectiles at the sample producing short-lived pulses of extremely high pressure. We use the full range of high pressure techniques in the High Pressure Science and Engineering Center at UNLV. In Pamela's lab, we use the "large volume" press called the Deformation-DIA, a "Griggs" modified piston-cylinder apparatus, and the Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC). Each type of apparatus is described in more detail below.

Deformation-DIA Apparatus

1000-ton press at X17B2. The white beam enters the hutch through the beam pipe (seen at the far right). The detector sits on the table on the far side of the press underneath the LN dewer (tan with red stripe).

We use the D-DIA apparatus located at the X17B2 beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to conduct deformation experiments (currently we are working on olivine and quartz. The apparatus can pressurize samples to approximately 15 GPa and also deform samples at a controlled rate.

Design diagram of the D-DIA module.

The D-DIA apparatus is a module that fits inside a large hydraulic press. It consists of 6 WC or diamond tipped anvils, the top and bottom of which move independently. The sample, which is placed between the anvils, is encased inside an epoxy or mullite cube. During the course of the experiment, synchrotron x-rays pass through gaps in the anvils and diffracted x-rays are collected by ten detectors. The diffracted x-rays are used to record the elastic deformation of the samples' crystal lattice that occurs during deformation.

Photograph looking down on the four side anvils with the sample in the center. The yellow lines show the path of the x-rays.

The sample assembly resting on the bottom anvil following deformation.

Sample Assembly Components

We use a sample assembly which consists of more than a dozen parts that fit in a 3mm hole in a 6mm cube. Below is a cross section of the cube showing the assembly.

The major parts of the sample assembly are fabricated by the machine shop at Stony Brook which is funded by COMPRES. The following is a list of the sample assembly components:

Piston Cylinder

The Griggs Machine

We have a Griggs modified piston cylinder in Pamela's lab. Our Griggs apparatus can achieve around 1.5 GPa. The sample assembly contains a furnace that allows us to heat samples to about 1300˚C. For more details on how the Griggs machine works, click here.

In-Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

Synchrotrons produce incredibly powerful x-rays that we can use to probe our samples while they are at high pressure and high temperature. We do most of our work at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) using the D-DIA apparatus located at X17B2. We use white x-rays (as opposed to monochromatic) to produce diffraction as well as make radiographic images of our samples.

Dawn Pape, Chris Cline, Sylvia-Monique Thomas and our collaborator, Don Weidner at the X17B2 beamline at the National Synchrotron light source.

Pamela placing the DDIA anvils in the SAM85 press.

0% sleep - 100% business. From left: Sylvia-Monique, Chris, and Andy at X17B2 Brookhaven National Laboratory.


X17B2

The equipment at the X17B2 beamline allows us to record energy dispersive diffraction patterns from 10 detectors.

Each detector records a full powder pattern of the sample. This allows us to gather a tremendous amount of data about what various crystal populations are doing within the sample.

Raw X-ray diffraction spectra from the multi-element detector.

Radiographs captured during the experiment allow us to calculate the strain.

An example of the kinds of experiments we are doing using the D-DIA can be found on the quartz page.

Research Focus Areas > Microstructural Studies

Microstructural Studies

The macroscopic behavior of rocks is generated at the microstructural scale. Therefore it is important to carefully observe what has happened to specimens after the fact. Besides, microstructures are fascinating and pretty.

We use Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) as well as Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy.

Research Focus Areas > Modeling Studies

Modeling Studies

Computer models allow us to test simple assumptions and follow them beyond where intuition will take us.

We use computer models in conjunction with experimental and microstructural studies. Some examples are Finite Element Modeling (FEM) studies and Elastic-Plastic Self-Consistent (EPSC) modeling studies.

This inclusion is "u"-shaped. However, we are able to fit it with a cigar-shaped inclusion. This is because the channels are not close enough to interact.

EPSC simulation of the effect of plastic deformation or x-ray lattice reflections. After glide begins to opperate at 0.025%. Sample strain, lattice reflections exhibit diverging of strain due to the different degrees of plastic relaxation between the grain populations producing diffraction.

Mineral Physics 101 >

Mineral Physics 101


Mineral Physics 101 is a COMPRES is funded effort to assemble materials for an entry level graduate course in Mineral Physics designed for use in a distance education setting. A DE graduate course provides a solution to the problem many mineral physics faculty face when there are not enough mineral physics graduate students at their institution for a graduate course in mineral physics to "make". The course was taught from UNLV in Spring 2012.

The home page for the course is found here here.

As part of the course we wrote a series of educational modules that can be found on the SERC website .

E-mail regarding the course can be sent to:

mineralphysics101@gmail.com

Recent Projects > Olivine



Olivine Deformation

(No content yet)

Publications >

Publications

  • Burnley, P. C. (in prep.) Elastic Plastic Self Consistent (EPSC) Modeling of Plastic Deformation in Fayalite Olivine, to be submitted to Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 12 pages and 11 figures.

  • Tanis, E.A., Simon A.,Tschauner O., Chow P., Xiao Y., Burnley P., Cline, C., Hanchar, J.,Pettke, T., Shen, G., Zhao, Y. (in prep.) Experimental constraints on the mobility of Nb-rutile in NaCl- and NaF-bearing aqueous fluids during the blueschist to eclogite transition in subduction zones, to be submitted to American Mineralogist, 16 pages and 7 figures

  • Burnley, P. C., 2013, The Importance of Stress Percolation Patterns in Rocks and other Polycrystalline Materials. Nature Communications. 4:2117, doi:10.1038/ ncomms3117

  • Burnley, P.C, Cline, C. and Drew, A., 2013, Kinking in Mg2GeO4 olivine: an EBSD study. American Mineralogist. V. 98, p. 927–931

  • Burnley, P.C.and Getting I.C. 2012 Creating a High Temperature Environment at High Pressure in a Gas Piston Cylinder Apparatus. Review of Scientific Instruments, v. 83:1, doi: 10.1063/1.3677844

  • Jarrett, O. S. and Burnley, P. C. 2010 Lessons on the role of fun/playfulness from a geology undergraduate summer research program. Journal of Geoscience Education, v. 58, n. 2, p. 110-120.

  • Burnley, P.C. and Zhang, D. 2008 Interpreting in-situ x-ray diffraction data from high pressure deformation experiments using elastic plastic self consistent models: an example using quartz, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, v 20, doi:10.1088/0953-8984/20/28/285201, 10pp

  • Jarrett, O. S. and Burnley, P.C., 2007, The role of fun, playfulness, and creativity in science: Lessons from geoscientists, in Play and Culture Studies Volume 7, D. Sluss and O. Jarrett Eds., University Press of America, New York, 188-202.

  • Burnley, P.C. and Schmidt, C., 2006 Finite element modeling of elastic volume changes in fluid inclusions: Comparison with experiment, American Mineralogist. v91, no. 11-12, pp. 1807-1814.

  • Burnley, P. C., 2005, Investigation of martensitic-like transformation from Mg2GeO4 olivine to its spinel structure polymorph. Am. Min., v 90, no. 8-9, pp. 1315-1324.

  • Burnley, Pamela C., Davis, Mary K., 2004, Volume Changes in Fluid Inclusions Produced by Heating and Pressurization: A Finite Element Modeling Study. The Canadian Mineralogist, v 42, pp. 1369-1382.

  • Burnley, P.C., 2004, An Earth Science Scrapbook Project as an Alternative Assessment Tool. Journal of Geoscience Education, v 52, n 3, pp. 245-249.

  • Jarrett, O. S. and Burnley, P. C. 2003 Engagement in authentic geoscience research: Effects on undergraduates and secondary teachers. Journal of Geoscience Education, v 51, n 1, pp. 85-90.

  • Burnley, P. C., Jarrett, O. S., and Evans W., 2002, A Comparison of Approaches and Instruments for Evaluating a Geological Sciences Research Experiences Program, Journal of Geoscience Education, v. 50, n. 1, pp.15-24.

  • Hofmeister, A. Cynn, H., Burnley, P. C. and Meade, C., 1999, Vibrational Spectra of Dense, Hydrous Magnesium Silicates at Pressure: Importance of the Hydrogen Bond Angle. Am. Min. v 84, pp. 454-464.

  • Getting, I. C., Dutton, S. J., Burnley, P. C., Karato, S.-i., Spetzler, H. A., 1997, Shear attenuation and dispersion in MgO. Phys.Earth Planet. Lett. 99, pp. 249-257.

  • Phillips, B. L., Burnley, P. C., Worminghaus, K. and Navrotsky A., 1997, 29Si and 1H NMR Spectroscopy of High-Pressure Hydrous Magnesium Silicates. Phys. Chem. Minerals. v 24, pp. 179-190.

  • Cynn, H., Hofmeister, A. M., Burnley, P. C., Navrotsky, A., 1996, Thermodynamic properties and hydrogen speciation from vibrational spectra of dense hydrous magnesium silicates. Phys. Chem. Min., v 23, pp. 361-376.

  • Burnley, P. C. and Navrotsky, A., 1996, Synthesis of high-pressure hydrous magnesium silicates: observations and analysis. Am. Min. v 81, pp. 317-326.

  • Burnley, P.C., 1995, The fate of olivine in subducting slabs: a reconnaissance study. Am. Min. v 80, pp. 1293-1301.

  • Burnley, P.C., Bassett, W.A. and Wu, T. -c., 1995, Diamond anvil study of the transformation mechanism from the olivine to spinel phase in Co2SiO4, Ni2SiO4 and Mg2GeO4. Jour. Geophys. Res. v 100, pp. 17,715-17,724.

  • Navrotsky, A., Rapp, R. P., Smelik, E., Burnley, P., Circone, S., Chai, L., Bose, K., and Westrich, H. R., 1994, The behavior of H2O and CO2 in high-temperature lead borate solution calorimetry of volatile-bearing phases. Am. Min., v 79, pp. 1099-1109.

  • Wu, T. -c., Bassett, W.A., Burnley, P.C. and Weathers, M.S., 1993, Shear-promoted phase transformation in Fe2SiO4 and Mg2SiO4 and the mechanism of deep earthquakes. Jour. Geophys. Res. v 98, pp. 19,767-19,776.

  • Burnley, P.C., Green, H.W. and Prior, D., 1991, Faulting Associated with the olivine to spinel transformation in Mg2GeO4 and its implications for deep-focus earthquakes. Jour. Geophys. Res. v. 96, pp. 425-443.

  • Green, H.W. and Burnley, P.C., 1990, The failure mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes. In Deformation Mechanisms, Rheology and Tectonics, R.J. Knipe and E.H. Rutter eds., Geological Society Special Publication no. 54, Geological Society London. pp. 133-141.

  • Burnley, P.C. and Green, H.W., 1989, Stress dependence of the mechanism of the olivine-spinel transformation. Nature, v 338, pp. 753-756.

  • Green, H.W. and Burnley, P.C., 1989, A new, self-organizing, mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes. Nature, v 341, pp. 733-737.

  • Field Guide Chapters and Other Publications

  • Burnley, P. 2011 “The Multi-Anvil Apparatus” On the Cutting Edge – Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty, Teaching Mineral Physics Collection.

  • Burnley, P. 2011 “ The Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC)” On the Cutting Edge – Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty, Teaching Mineral Physics Collection.

  • Burnley, P. 2011 “High Pressure Deformation Experiments” On the Cutting Edge – Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty, Teaching Mineral Physics Collection.

  • Burnley, P. 2011 “Tensors: Stress, Strain and Elasticity” On the Cutting Edge – Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty, Teaching Mineral Physics Collection.

  • Burnley, P. 2011 “ Phase Equilibria at High Pressure” On the Cutting Edge – Professional Development for Geoscience Faculty, Teaching Mineral Physics Collection.

  • Williams, Q., Brown, M.J., Tyburczy, J., van Orman, J. Burnley, P., Parise, J., Rivers, M., Wentzcovitch R., Liebermann, R. 2010 Understanding the Building Blocks of the Planet: The Materials Science of Earth Processes, Report to the National Science Foundation. COMPRES Consortium, 68 pp.

  • Hanley, T. B., Kar, A., Burnley, P., Scanlan, M. and Wilson, C., 2005, Phenix City gneiss amphibolite and associated rocks of the Uchee belt, western Georgia and eastern Alabama. In Field Trip Guide for the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Section of the Geological Society of America, M. G. Steltenpohl ed., Alabama Geological Society, pp. 115.

  • Burnley, P. and Brocks, B., 2001, Characterization of Veins and Associated Alteration in a Bedrock Core Taken from the Brevard Zone, Cobb County, Georgia. In Across the Brevard Zone: The Chattahoochee Tunnel, Cobb County, Georgia. R. L. Kath and T. J. Crawford eds., Georgia Geological Society Guidebook, v 21, n 1, October 2001, pp. 39-41.

Recent Projects > Quartz

Quartz Deformation

We are conducting deformation experiments on Quartz using the D-DIA apparatus. The following is an example of the data we collect.

Portion of an x-ray diffraction pattern showing the quartz (100) peak in the compression and transverse detectors. The differential lattice strain (ehkl) is calculated from the difference in peak positions between the two sets of detectors.

Below are lattice spacings for the quartz (100), (101), and (112) reflections as a function of time during the deformation experiment. The calculated "hydrostatic" d-spacing is shown as a dashed line. The position of each reflection is measured as a function of time during the deformation experiment. D-spacings for the vertical pair of detectors (1 & 2) shrink more than for the horizontal pair (3 & 4), reflecting increasing differential stress.

Lattice spacings for the quartz (100) reflection.

Lattice spacing for the quartz (101) reflection.

Lattice spacing for the quartz (112) reflection.

We use Elastic-Plastic Self-Consistent (EPSC) Models to interpret our diffraction data. EPSC Models assume that ductile deformation is controlled by the motion of dislocations and/or by twinning.

We were able to simulate our diffraction data collected at 800°C with an EPSC Model that used only basal and prismatic slip. This is consistent with the slip systems that are thought to operate at this temperature.

For out most recent poster on quartz deformation, click here.

Research Tools > SEM

Scanning Electron Microscopy

SEM is also a very powerful tool for characterizing microstructures. Secondary electron detectors allow us to see the shape of the sample, and the backscatter detector emphasizes differences in density. By imaging etched polished samples we can take advantage of both signals.

Here are some examples of partially transformed Mg2GeO4.

Mg2GeO4 olivine partially transformed to spinel (white) under hydrostatic conditions. Notice the lens shape morphology and the buds growing on the sides.

This sample of Mg2GeO4 olivine was partially transformed to the spinel phase by the martensitic-like mechanism at 10GPa and 800°C. In this case a mixture of backscatter and secondary signal allows the spinel lamellae to be visualized.

We use Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) to map crystallographic orientation. This technique allows us to measure preferred orientations and to see internal deformation within grains. The EBSD is currently installed on the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) at the Electron Microanalysis and Imaging Laboratory (EMiL) at UNLV. EBSD allows the orientation of grains to be measured by the SEM. The software produces orientation maps, pole figures, and grain shape measurements.

EBSD map of deformed Mg2GeO4 specimen.

The Group > Our Group



Our Group

Shereena Dyer and Mai Sas examining a sample.

For a list of past and present students, please click here.

For information on available graduate student projects, please click here.

For information on what it is like to work as an undergraduate in Pamela's lab, please click here



Research Tools > TEM

Transmission Electron Microscopy

TEM gives us the highest resolution images by shining a beam of electrons directly through the sample. Contrast in the image is caused by diffraction.

Micrograph of very fine grained spinel and diffraction pattern showing the 220, 311, 422, 511, 440 spinel lines. Very fine grain size lead a phenomena known as superplasticity.

Mg2GeO4 spinel lamellae developed in Mg2GeO4 olivine by the Martensitic-like transformation mechanism (1600 GPa, 100°C).

Group of Mg2GeO4 spinel grains nucleated on olivine/olivine grain boundary (1.9 GPa 1290 K (max stress = 973 MPa)).

Information on how TEM works can be found here.

The Group > Undergraduate Work

Working As An Undergraduate

Our group has a relaxed atmosphere. Undergraduates work on projects that suit their interests and abilities and are free to work on schedules that fit with their course work. We usually have 5 to 7 undergrads in the group. Doing research as an undergraduate is a great way to find out if research is something that you are well suited for. For more information, please feel free to contact Pamela.

Past and Present Group Members

Faculty

  • Pamela Burnley, Associate Research Professor (UNLV)
  • Sylvia-Monique Thomas, Research Assistant Professor (UNLV)

Interns and Post-Doctoral Scholars

  • Andreas Willenweber (2012)
  • Yongjun Chen (2012)
  • Dongmei Zhang (2006-2007)

Doctorate Students

  • Brandon M. Guttery (2012-2013)

Masters Students, thesis

  • Christopher J. Cline II (2012-present)
  • Alex Drue (2009-2011)
  • Lacy Luscri (2012-present)
  • Kara Marsac (2013-present)

Masters Students, non-thesis

  • Deblina Datta (2008) - Georgia State University
  • Andrew Sikora (2000) - Georgia State University

Undergraduates

University of Nevada Las Vegas

Dan Haber (2013-present)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data, Navajo Mines project.

Richard Rowland (2012-present)

  • Responsibilities: FEM modeling, sample preparation, Griggs machine sample preparation.

Evan Mohr (2013-present)

  • Responsibilities: Griggs machine sample preparation.

Adela Fernandez (2013-present)

  • Responsibilities: Navajo mines project.

Katie Peterson (2012-present)

  • Responsibilities: Griggs machine sample preparation, thermal modeling, P/T stability of Bastnasite.

Kathryn Wilson (2013-present)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Michael J. Barnes (2012)

  • Responsibilities: Sample preparation

Timothy A. Bright (2012-2013)

  • Responsibilities: Sample preparation, video editing, analysis of synchroton x-ray diffraction data.

Alexandra K. Kosmides (2011-2012)

  • Responsibilities: Sample preparation, equipment orders.

Christopher J. Cline II (2011-2012)

  • Responsibilities: Elastic Plastic Self Consistent modeling, and Electron Backscatter Diffraction, data collection and analysis.
  • Publication(s): Cline II, C.J., Burnley, P.C., Thomas, S.-M. (2012) The effect of grain orientation versus the local stress environment on microstructures in polycrystalline San Carlos olivine. Eos, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union, 92, Fall Meeting Supplement, December 3rd – 7th 2012 (San Francisco, USA).

Timothy Howell (2011)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Dawn E. Pape (2010-2012)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data, mineralogy teaching assistant.

Brian K. Erickson (2010-2012)

  • Responsibilities: Sample preparation and lab work.

Mai Sas (2010-2012)

  • Responsibilities: Sample preparation, synchrotron x-ray data analysis, website management.

Jeremy Lawson (2009-2011)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Steven McDonnell (2010)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Shereena Dyer (2008-2010)

  • Responsibilities: Sample preparation and synchrotron x-ray data analysis.

John Boisvert (2008-2009)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Sergio Dieguez (2007-2009)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data and analysis of thermal gradients in a D-DIA sample assembly.

Milos Visekruna (2008-2009)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Shannon Gould (2008)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of thermal gradients in a D-DIA sample assembly.

Emily Hartnett (2007-2008)

  • Responsibilities: High pressure instrumentation development.

John Karr (2008)

  • Project Title: Identification of solid inclusions in garnets in garnet muscovite schists from the Funeral Mountains.

Mike Brawner (2008-2010)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data and EPSC modeling of fayalite.
  • Publication(s): Burnley, P.C., M. Brawner, and G. Hoth (2008), Elastic Plastic Self Consistent (EPSC) Modeling of plastic deformation in olivine, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract MR33G-1864.

 

Georgia State University

Chris Collins (2006-2007)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Christine Collins (2007)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Mandy Reinshagen (2006-2007)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Morgan Warren (2007)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data.

Beth Lavoie (2005-2006)

  • Responsibilities: Sample assembly development for the D-DIA apparatus.
  • Project Title: Relocation of the alpha, beta, gamma triple junction in Co2SiO4 using synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

Chris Turner (2005-2006)

  • Responsibilities: High pressure instrumentation development.

Phillip Hanes (2004)

  • Project Title: Building finite element meshes showing the interactions between stresses surrounding neighboring fluid inclusions.

Verra Kosturi (2003-2004)

  • Responsibilities: High pressure instrumentation development.

Jamarcus Terrell (2002-2003)

  • Publication(s):
    1. Terrell, J., Burnley, P., Kar, A., Dolan, B., K. Range, K., Gray, J. and Hanley, T., 2002, Pressure-Temperature Path Followed During Exhumation of the Southern Appalachians - Constraints from Microthermometry of Fluid Inclusions in Metamorphic Rocks from the Uchee Belt, Western Georgia and Eastern Alabama, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meeting, v 83, n 47, p. F1305 abstract T71A-1170.
    2. Burnley, P. C., Raymer, J. and Terrell, J.R., 2003, Characterization of veins and associated alteration observed in the Chattahochee Tunnel, Cobb County, GA, Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Section of the Geological Society of America*, *paper #14-3.

Barbara Brocks (2001-2002)

  • Publication(s): Burnley, P. and Brocks, B., 2001, Characterization of Veins and Associated Alteration in a Bedrock Core Taken from the Brevard Zone, Cobb County, Georgia. In Across the Brevard Zone: The Chattahoochee Tunnel, Cobb County, Georgia. R. L. Kath and T. J. Crawford eds., Georgia Geological Society Guidebook, v 21, n 1, October 2001, pp. 39-41.

Buffie Chournos (2002)

  • Project Title: Fluid Inclusions from Brevard Zone, Cobb County Georgia.

Kelly Adams (1998-2000)

  • Project Title: Finite element modeling of martensitic-like transformation between olivine and spinel.

Kate Davis (1999-2000)

  • Publication(s):
    1. Burnley, P. C., and M. K. Davis (2004), Volume changes in fluid inclusions produced by heating and pressurization: A finite element modeling study, The Canadian Mineralogist, 42, 1369-1382.
    2. Burnley, P. C., M. K. Davis, M. Blount, C. Dozier, D. Khallouf, L. Lukes, P. Pepper, J.C. Gray, D. A. Vanko, and A. Kar (2000), The use of numerical methods to study decrepitation and volume changes of fluid inclusions, Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs, 32, 7, A-153.
    3. Davis, M. K. and P. C. Burnley (2000) Finite element modeling of stresses developed around fluid inclusions in quartz, EOS, Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union., 81, 19, S39.

Katie completed her PhD in Geology at the University of Michigan in 2004.

Megan Leheay (1999-2000)

  • Project Title: Characterization and Monte Carlo modeling of the size distribution of martensitic-like spinel lamellae in olivine.

REU Students

Karen Worminghaus (1993) SUNY Stony Brook

  • Project Title: Synthesis of chondrodite.
  • Publication(s): Phillips, B. L., P.C. Burnley, K. Worminghaus, and A. Navrotsky (1997), 29Si and 1H NMR spectroscopy of high-pressure hydrous magnesium silicates, Phys. Chem. Minerals, 24, 179-190.

Karen was a participant in the CHiPR summer scholars program.

Mike Brawner (2008-2010)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data and EPSC modeling of fayalite.
  • Publication(s): Burnley, P.C., M. Brawner, and G. Hoth (2008), Elastic Plastic Self Consistent (EPSC) Modeling of plastic deformation in olivine, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract MR33G-1864.

Greg Hoth (2008)

  • Responsibilities: Analysis of synchrotron x-ray diffraction data and EPSC modeling of fayalite.
  • Publication(s): Burnley, P. C., M. Brawner, and G. Hoth (2008), Elastic Plastic Self Consistent (EPSC) Modeling of plastic deformation in olivine, Eos Trans. AGU, 89(53), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract MR33G-1864.

Greg was a participant in the UNLV Physics Department REU program.

Michael Rodriguez (2010)

  • Project Title: Raman Spectroscopy of Olivine.

Brittany Morgan (2010)

  • Project Title: Raman Spectroscopy of Olivine.

Quinton Guerrero (2011) Monmouth College

  • Project Title: Dislocation density of mantle Olivine.

Quinlan Smith (2011) California Lutheran College

  • Project Title: Dislocation density of mantle Olivine.

Erin McElhone (2012)

  • Project Title: P/T stability of Bastnasite.

Sean Robinson (2012)

  • Project Title: P/T stability of Bastnasite.

NeRD Lab Photo Gallery


Our Lab


Beam Time