UNLV

Department of Psychology

Interactive Measurement Group

PSY 496 / 498

Independent Study
and
Independent Research

 

Barchard photo
Dr. Kimberly A. Barchard
Fall 2013 Syllabus

 

Course Overview

Lab Meetings

Projects

Posters

Team Members

Grading

 

Send comments on this syllabus to Dr. Barchard




























































PSY 496 / 498
Mission Statement

The Interactive Measurement Group will: (1) prepare students for post-baccalaureate education and careers, by helping them identify career and educational goals, develop their leadership and teamwork skills, develop their communication (oral and written) and computer skills, and develop their research skills; and (2) conduct research on psychometric topics, by collecting, scoring, and analyzing data on psychometric topics, and presenting results in professional forums (e.g., conferences, publications).





























































PSY 496 / 498
Course Objectives

This course will introduce students to all aspects of the research process, including (1) literature review, (2) study design and creation, and (3) scoring, data analysis, and presentation.  Students will read and present research literature.  They will be involved in the creation and administration of new research studies.  They will score, enter, and analyze data.  They will present research findings both verbally and in written form.

Course Requirements

Students can enroll in 1 – 6 credits of Independent Study or Independent Research.  Students will only be allowed to enroll in less than 3 credits if they have already been in Dr. Barchard’s lab for at least one semester.








 

 

 

 

 

 

 




PSY 496 / 498
Required Text

American Psychological Association (2009).  APA Publication Manual, 6th Edition.  Available from the UNLV bookstore, http://www.apastyle.org, and http://www.amazon.com.

 

Recommended Resource

Purdue University has a helpful online writing lab. It includes essential information about APA format.  It is located here:
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Lab Hours

Recording Lab Hours

Students will record the hours they spend on general lab work and on each project to which they are assigned, using the lab hours GoogleDocs spreadsheet.  It is important that students record their hours every week, because Dr. Barchard uses these records to determine if any students are falling behind or are being overwhelmed.  It is also important that students update their planned hours regularly.  Plans change.  Sometimes, students get sick or have family emergencies.  Sometimes students have three exams on the same day.  So, if you get ahead or behind on your hours, make sure you update your planned hours for future weeks to get back on track.  There are two ways to do this.  For example, if you are ahead on your hours, you can either DECREASE your planned hours for NEXT week so that your cumulative planned hours are correct, or you can plan to work the same number of hours as usual and INCREASE your CUMULATIVE planned hours.

Don’t stress out about the distinction between general lab hours and project hours too much.  Make sure that all of your time in the lab is recorded as general lab hours or as one of the specific projects you are working on.  If you find you are uncertain about how to categorize your lab hours, ask the lab manager or the lab hour coordinator for help.  The goal of recording general lab hours and project hours separately is simply to ensure that everyone contributes to on-going lab work and that no one lets their project team members down.

Spending Time in the Lab

Students are encouraged to spend time in the lab, even when they are not doing lab work.  However, time in the lab only counts as lab hours if the student is working on tasks relevant to the lab.  As well, during the lab hours from 3:00 – 7:00pm on Wednesday, students should be working on lab tasks such as writing, training, general lab work, and workshops. 

Workload

If you are taking 3 credits for 180 hours, this is 12 hours per week during the fall and spring semesters.  Each student must commit to at least 4 hours of general lab work per week.  Students who are working on a project and/or a poster must commit at least 4 hours to each project or poster they are working on.  However, each student will have a unique combination of general lab work and project/poster work.  Some students will spend all their lab hours on general lab work.  Some students may choose to focus their time on one project and spend 12 or more hours per week on it.  Some students may be working on a poster and a project (each for at least 4 hours per week).  Finally, some students will work on two projects (each for at least 4 hours per week).

If students feel like they have too little or too much work, or if they feel like they aren’t being challenged enough or are being overwhelmed, they should email both Dr. Barchard and the lab manager.  They will work with you to adjust your tasks appropriately.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


PSY 496 / 498
General Lab Work

General lab work is everything that is not directly related to a project that the student is assigned to.  All of the time spent on any of these will count as lab hours.  When a student provides feedback to help another team with their project, for example, that counts as general lab work. General lab work also includes creating and attending workshops (that are not directly related to a project that the student is assigned to), mentoring new students (on skills that are not directly related to a project that the student is assigned to), data entry (that is not directly related to a project that the student is assigned to), and scoring (that is not directly related to a project that the student is assigned to).  Each student must commit to doing at least 4 hours of general lab work each week.

Activities

Dr. Barchard and the lab manager will ask you to complete a number of tasks that directly assist Dr. Barchard in collecting data and publishing her findings.  You may also be asked to participate in activities that help keep the lab running.  Some activities that help Dr. Barchard collect data include: 1) designing a new psychological test, 2) selecting measures for inclusion in a new study, 3) designing a website that collects data, 4) proof-reading a website, 5) answering email questions regarding an on-going study, 6) assigning credit for an on-going study, and 7) designing a new method of scoring a test.  Some activities that help Dr. Barchard publish her findings include: 1) entering data, 2) scoring tests, 3) finding materials through PsycINFO and the library, 4) copying materials, 5) proof-reading SPSS Syntax files, and 6) proof-reading manuscripts.  Some activities that help keep the lab running are: 1) keeping the lab orderly, 2) keeping the computers running by performing virus scans and critical updates, 3) giving orientations to new lab members, 4) training other students, and 5) helping other students with their research tasks and conference presentations. 

Writing Circles

Some students will participate in writing circles each week.  This will be optional, but once you commit to a writing circle, you will need to bring 2-3 pages of writing to the writing circles.  This writing can either be lab-related, such as posters or project papers you are working on, or it can be writing for another class outside of the lab.  Your pages must be double spaced, single sided, and unstapled.  To save paper, you may re-use old paper if you like, but only print YOUR writing on one side of the page.  You must bring three copies of the paper (one copy for you, and one copy for each of two other people in your writing circle).

One hour of writing circles can count towards labs hours each week, regardless of the content of the writing that you review. If the writing you are working on is a lab project, then the additional time you spend to incorporate the feedback also counts as lab hours. However, if the writing you are working on during the circle is NOT a lab project, then the additional time you spend to incorporate feedback does not count as lab hours.


 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Projects

Projects are completed in teams. Student team members will meet amongst themselves once or twice weekly and will have a set of concrete goals. Most teams will meet once per week with Dr. Barchard, or will provide a detailed written progress report by email, if they cannot meet with Dr. Barchard in person. Most project teams will create a product: a website, a program, or a paper. Some project teams will create multiple products. The project team will work with Dr. Barchard to agree upon their goals. All time spent working towards any of these goals will count as project hours. Every team member must commit at least 4 hours per week working towards these goals. Some team members will focus solely upon one project and will devote 12 or more hours per week on those goals. Others may join two projects, but must devote at least 4 hours to each project each week. When a project team jointly decides that its members will work on a particular task, that time will count as project hours: the project team meeting minutes will explicitly state that the TEAM decided that a team MEMBER will do a task. However, when Dr. Barchard or the lab manager or even a project team asks a LAB member to work on a task, that work will generally fall under the heading of general lab work. For example, if a team who is creating a website asks a team member and a non-team member for feedback on their website, the team member will count it as project hours and the non-team member will count it as general lab hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Posters

Some project teams will create empirically-based conference-type posters, using data that has been collected in the lab – often data that the team has collected or scored themselves. This poster will include a literature review, description of how the data was collected, results of your data analysis (conducted with SPSS), and a discussion of your findings. All assignments must be typed. The final poster consists of two parts: the poster and the handout. Detailed instructions on how to create these are given in the poster assignments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Presentations

All lab members will be required to give a PowerPoint presentation at the end of the semester. The presentation will be done individually. The content of the presentation can be any projects or posters that were in process during the semester. Each presentation will last between 5 and 10 minutes. The student presenters must practice their presentations in front of at least two separate audiences before presenting a project presentation, so that they can talk fluently and only refer to their notes occasionally.

If you are not presenting your poster or project, you will still present. We have a workshop on interviews. It includes a list of questions that you might be asked during an interview for graduate school. If you will not be presenting a project or poster, then you should prepare to present your answers to 3-5 of these questions, in PowerPoint format. See the file S:\BarchardsLab\Workshops\Interview Day\Presentation on Interview Day 8 Kelly and Ashley.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Purpose of Lab Meetings

Lab hours will be held every Wednesday from 3:00 – 7:00pm. The lab manager and assistant lab managers will be in the lab during this time. They will help students with any tasks they are working on and also provide training. Students will usually work on general lab work during this time. Students may work on projects during these official lab hours if they have no general lab work that needs to be done.

During these meetings, students will be taught useful skills (such as how to present research, improve writing skills, and learn about various software programs) and will discuss preparation for graduate school. These meetings will also review progress on lab projects, such as data entry, scoring, and study design. Attendance at these meetings is required and counts as general lab work, regardless of the content of the meetings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Tentative Schedule

Date 3:00 - 4:00 4:00 - 5:00 5:00 - 6:00 6:00 - 7:00
28-Aug 3 - 4:30   Introductions  

4:30 - 5:30   Team meetings

5:30 - 6:00 DV Meeting  Recording Lab hours in GoogleDocs
4-Sep LEAS training Team meetings DV Meeting Lab website Bios
11-Sep LEAS training Team meetings DV Meeting Draft letter to prospective advisor
18-Sep LEAS training Team meetings DV Meeting List possible Grad Schools and Mentors
25-Sep LEAS training Team meetings DV Meeting Draft CV
2-Oct LEAS training Team meetings DV Meeting Draft Statement of Purpose
9-Oct LEAS training Team meetings DV Meeting Website design
16-Oct Work on websites Team meetings DV Meeting Website design
23-Oct Work on websites Team meetings DV Meeting Website design
30-Oct Work on websites Team meetings DV Meeting Draft interview answers
6-Nov Work on websites Team meetings DV Meeting  
13-Nov  Mock Interviews  Mock Interviews Discussion of Interviews  Team meetings
20-Nov Practice Presentation Team meetings
Website Presentations
27-Nov
Thanksgiving week
4-Dec Practice Presentation Team meetings Spring Planning
Project Presentations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Workshops

All workshops are given during lab meetings and are presented by other lab members. The assigned student leaders must practice their presentation in front of at least two separate audiences before presenting a workshop during the lab meetings so that they are able to talk fluently and only refer to their notes occasionally. Student leaders will be expected to read the workshop and complete the assignment before they give the presentation. Lab members will read the workshop as homework and then work on the assignment during lab hours. Ideally, workshops should be interactive, involving discussion, exercises, and personal examples. All leaders must complete the Workshop on Giving Workshops, at least 2 weeks before their presentation date. This workshop is given in the folder. S:\BarchardsLab\Lab\Workshops\01 Do not put on website\Giving Workshops  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Project Overview

Students will work on their projects in groups of 2 to 4 students. Most students will find that working in groups makes it less time-consuming to complete their project and that their projects are of better quality. In addition, this will make it possible for students to work on advanced projects, even if they do not yet have all the necessary skills. For example, a student who has not yet taken a statistics or research methods course can be involved in original research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Getting Help

All project team leaders will meet with Dr. Barchard for at least one hour every week. In addition, teams may email her with questions or requests for additional appointments. Most meetings will occur in-person in Dr. Barchard’s office. If the student is out of town, they will have a long-distance meeting, using phone and/or Internet. Check with Dr. Barchard regarding the workshops you should complete to prepare yourself for these long-distance meetings.

If the team is writing a document, they are also encouraged to send their document to a designated lab member each time they add a new section or do a substantial revision of an old section, to receive feedback on the clarity of their writing and their conformance to APA style. Please note that the lab member will usually not be able to provide any guidance about the direction and goals of the project, nor the content of the writing; Dr. Barchard will work with the teams on those issues. When asking the lab member for help with the clarity of your writing, tell him or her the new or revised section that you want them to provide feedback on, and ask them to answer the following questions: (1) where were you lost or confused about where the paper was going? (2) what section was the hardest to read and understand? and (3) do you see any obvious violations of APA format?

If the team is creating another product, such as a website or computer program, they are also encouraged to send their materials to a designated lab member each time they add a new section or substantially revise an old section. That lab member cannot provide guidance on the direction and goals of the project nor the content of the materials, but can provide feedback on the clarity and organization of the materials.

Project teams should also ask for feedback from additional lab members. For most projects, you will ask non-team members for feedback twice during the semester. To avoid over-burdening lab members, though, include the fact that you want to ask non-team members for feedback in your weekly goals, and receive approval from Dr. Barchard before proceeding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Project Meetings

You will meet with your team members once or twice a week for a minimum of 1 hour, at regularly scheduled times.  These meetings count as part of your project hours.  Note: if you are on two teams with the same people, you will meet with those people for the required hours for each project each week.

The purpose of these meetings is to work on specific goals of the project and to discuss the topic in general. If you complete all of your goals for the week before the end of your second meeting of week, you must stay for the rest of your meeting time and discuss the topic in general.  Try discussing one or more of these topics:

If you are unable to finish all of your goals for the week during your meetings, you need to agree on a plan to get the weekly goals finished.  Allow NO MORE THAN 5 MINUTES at the END of each meeting to make this plan.  This plan may include extending the meeting, scheduling more time to meet in person or by phone, or dividing up the work and sending the completed work to one person.  This plan MUST NEVER include having a person who has been on the team for only a few weeks working on something by themselves; the entire point of having a TEAM is to mentor new students.

Because of the importance of meeting regularly, attendance at these meetings is required.  However, your course grade will not be automatically reduced for failure to attend a meeting.  If you are able to make a solid contribution to the project even though you missed a meeting, this will not reduce your course grade.  The day and time of the next meeting must be specified in the minutes from the current meeting, to avoid any confusion.  The day and time of a meeting can be changed (either temporarily or permanently) with the agreement of ALL team members.  It is important to note, however, that team members are under no obligation to acquiesce to someone’s request to change the meeting time.  When you agree to meet with your team at a certain time each week, it is your responsibility to do so.  Students do not expect teachers to reschedule class times to suit their schedules. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Project Products

All project teams will create one or more product(s).  Often this will be a written document, website, or program.  Discuss the end-products with Dr. Barchard during your meetings.  Make sure the product(s) are listed among the semester goals, and that you clarify the exact specifications for your product(s) during your meetings.

The product(s) MUST be saved on lab computers.  Specifically, written documents and programs must be saved on the cluster server.  Websites must be on the C drive of the computer in the front office in the lab, and on the internet at http://faculty.unlv.edu/img/  If the files are not on lab computers, they are not complete.  Just as you wouldn’t be given credit for a take-home exam unless you handed it to the instructor, teams receive no credit for work that is not on computers that all lab members have access to.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Project Presentations

At the end of the semester, one team member will discuss the project during the end-of-semester presentations.  Talk with each other and decide who will give that presentation.  That person should prepare a PowerPoint presentation that explains the purpose of your project, what you accomplished, and what the next steps in this research are.  Check with lab manager for your specific presentation time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Poster Overview

Poster teams will complete their posters in stages in order to ensure that they make continuous progress and receive sufficient feedback. Teams will receive a lot of feedback on their posters – from poster team members, the poster supervisor, Dr. Barchard, and others. This feedback will help students write more clearly and use the proper format for a research poster.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Poster Assignments

These posters will follow a series of poster assignments, which are given in the Poster Assignments document. Contact the project leader and Dr. Barchard immediately if these deadlines will not work with your schedule. Most posters will involve the analysis of data that has already been collected in our lab. Some posters will involve no data; they will simply be a literature review. Teams that are completing non-empirical posters should talk with Dr. Barchard about the intermediate assignments they will complete.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Poster Meetings

You will meet with your team members at least two times a week for a minimum of 1 hour, at regularly scheduled times.  These meetings count as part of your project hours.  Note: if you are on two teams with the same people (such as a project team and a related poster team), you will meet with those people for four hours each week.

Because of the importance of meeting regularly, attendance at these meetings is required. If a team member misses a meeting without a very good reason, their course grade will go down by 1%. The day and time of the next meeting must be specified in the minutes from the current meeting, to avoid any confusion.  The day and time of a meeting can be changed (either temporarily or permanently) with the agreement of ALL team members.  It is important to note, however, that team members are under no obligation to acquiesce to someone’s request to change the meeting time.  When you agree to meet with your team at a certain time each week, it is your responsibility to do so.  Students do not expect teachers to reschedule class times to suit their schedules.

The purpose of these meetings is to work on the specific goals of the project or poster and to discuss the topic in general. If you complete all of your goals for the week before the end of your second meeting of the week, you must stay for the rest of your meeting time and discuss the topic in general.  Try discussing one or more of these topics:

        1. Why is this research question important?  Why do we need to know the answer to this?

        2. If our project or poster turns out the way we expect, what are the implications of this? Why does this matter? How should people treat each other differently after they hear about our research? How should researchers design their studies differently after they hear about our research?

        3. Think about the main construct you are studying (e.g., emotional awareness, emotional intelligence, accuracy).  What is it, really?  What are the limitations of the measures you are using?

        4. After this project or poster is finished, what is the next project or poster we should do?

If you are unable to finish all of your goals for the week during your meetings, you need to agree on a plan to get the weekly goals finished.  Allow NO MORE THAN 5 MINUTES at the END of each meeting to make this plan.  This plan may include extending the meeting, scheduling more time to meet in person or by phone, or dividing up the work and sending the completed work to one person.

This plan MUST NEVER include having a person who has been on the team for only a few weeks working on something by themselves; the entire point of having a TEAM is to mentor new students.  There is one exception: when you are writing annotated bibliographies, after the team has completed the literature search and has decided which person will read which papers, then each team member can work independently on the annotated bibliographies.  But never ask a person who has not completed an entire poster to draft or revise any part of a poster by themselves, or to analyze any part of the data by themselves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Meeting Minutes

During your meetings, one person should be designated as responsible for taking and distributing meeting minutes.  This person will usually change each meeting.  The meeting minutes must specify:

        a. Team name
        b. Day, start time, end time of the meeting.
        c. If the meeting did not go for one hour, the EMERGENCY that prevented it from being one hour long.
        d. Who attended the meeting, who was late, who was absent.
        e. What was accomplished during the meeting?  If you want, you can copy and paste the steps from the assignment, but you may find it more helpful to summarize them.  When writing this summary, make sure it is understandable on its own; do NOT assume that the reader will look at any other document (such as the assignment) when reading your minutes.
         f. Your plan for finishing the assignment.  List any additional meetings, stating who will meet, where, and when.  List who will be responsible for completing each specific part of the assignment. Specify what materials will be sent to whom by when, and who will submit the assignment.
        g. The day and time of your next meeting.  If this is a change from your usual meeting time, state that this meeting time has been agreed upon by all team members.

Example meeting minutes are given below.  Save your meeting minutes on the cluster server, in your project team folder, in a subfolder called "Meeting Minutes".  Use the file name Team-Name Meeting Minutes Date.doc.  Immediately after your project meeting, email the name and location of the minutes to all team members and the project supervisor. If meeting minutes are not received, we will assume that all team members were absent, and so make sure you send them to the Project Supervisor immediately after the meeting (even if only one person showed up).

Meeting Minutes Example 1

Cottonwood Poster Team: LEAS poster

Meeting Minutes for Monday February 2, 2011, 2:30 – 3:45

Present: Jane, Steve

Late: Mary (Witnessed car accident on her way to UNLV. Had to wait until police said she could leave. Arrived 40 minutes late. She phoned to let us know she'd be late.)

Before the meeting: Everyone read the paper on the APA research report.

During the meeting: Worked on Assignment 5. Outlined introduction.  Created complete first draft.

Plan to finish Assignment 5:
1) Mary and Jane will meet in the lab on Friday from 3:00 – 4:30 to polish the Introduction.
2) Mary and Steve will meet in the lab on Friday from 4:30 – 5:00 to format References, and will email Jane when they are done.
3) Jane will proof-read References and submit assignment by the deadline on Tuesday.

Preparation for Assignment 6:
Jane will talk to the Poster Supervisor about the calculation of total scores.  If they can't figure it out, Jane will email Dr. Barchard about this.

Next Poster Team Meeting: Monday Feb 9, 2:30 – 3:30

Meeting Minutes Example 2

Green River Poster Team: DE poster

Meeting Minutes

Meeting
Tuesday February 16, 2011, 1:00 – 3:00

Attendance
Jill present
Shawn present
Michelle present (left at 2:45)

News and Reminders
Shawn found a new article on Emotional Intelligence and robots.  Everyone should read.
Michelle will be having surgery on Friday.  She won’t be at the meeting.  Team will have a 90-minute meeting when she returns.

Accomplishments
         * For assignment 6: Calculated descriptive statistics, and converted syntax and output to Word.  Drafted Participants and Procedures sections.  Discussed key sentences.
         * Emailed Dr. Barchard regarding problem with Shawn’s Novell account.

Plan
         * Michelle and Shawn will polish Introduction and Method and will add references to References section.  They will meet on Saturday sometime.  Michelle will be in on campus 8 – 4,           Shawn 9 – 2. They will call to decide when to meet.

         * Michelle will submit assignment by deadline on Tuesday.

Next Meeting
Tuesday Feb 23, 12:30 – 1:30.  Michelle will be absent, and Jill and Shawn have agreed to meet half an hour early that day.

 Meeting Minutes Example 3

Puppy Dog Tails Team: New LEAS Study

Meeting Minutes

Meeting
Thursday June 5, 2011, 6 – 7pm

Attendance
Wanwailai present
Margorie present
Steven present via Skype and GoogleDocs

Since Last Meeting
Marg completed the LEAS practice responses Set B
Wanwalai found a free form processor and tried it out
Steve and Wanwalai each brain-stormed 50 similes for the new Similes Test

Before Next Meeting
Marg will complete the LEAS practice responses Set C
Wanwalai will talk with Dr. Barchard about using the new form processor with this study
Steve and Wanwalai will each review the 50 similes that the other created

Accomplishments during This Meeting
         * Merged the similes that Steve and Wanwalai created
         * Revised description of Similes Test (for method section of the end-of-semester presentation this semester and the poster next semester)
         * Answered Marg’s questions about Set B.

Next Meeting
Tuesday June 10, 9 – 10am.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Professional Conferences

Most teams take their posters to a professional conference, such as the Western Psychological Association, although this is NOT a part of the course.  After the semester is finished, Dr. Barchard will work with the students to polish the poster so that it meets professional standards, and to submit the poster for presentation at a conference.  The project team members will be the primary authors and must agree upon the order of authorship.  The Project Supervisor will be listed as the second last author.  Dr. Barchard will be listed as the last author.  Detailed instructions on how to turn your course poster into a Professional Conference Presentation are given at S:\BarchardsLab\Workshops\01 Do not put on website\Conference Posters

If the team worked on the poster over multiple semesters, then the project leader must work with all team members to build consensus on the appropriate order of authorship – which can be challenging when some team members have not worked together.  Documenting the contributions of each team member can be valuable.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



PSY 496 / 498
Professor

Kim Barchard
barchard@unlv.nevada.edu
Office phone: 895-0758
Office number: CBC B346
Lab phone: 895-3093
Lab location: CDC 520
Dr. Barchard’s website: http://faculty.unlv.edu/barchard/

Talk to your instructor about course registration and grades.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Lab Manager

Anum Warsi
warsia@unlv.nevada.edu
Lab phone: 895-3093
Lab location: CDC 520
Lab website: http://faculty.unlv.edu/img/img/

Talk to the lab manager about lab meetings and record keeping, and all the things you do to assist us in the lab that count towards lab hours: data entry, scoring, data collection, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Lab Members

Name Team Course Required hours Planned hours
Anum Warsi   Volunteer 0 180
Kelly Grob  M Volunteer 0 120
Ashley Anderson DE Volunteer 0 180
Brianna Maxim - Trumbo Wiki  Volunteer 0 180
Dalton Terry M Volunteer 0 120
Paul Kirsh M Volunteer 0 60
Dan Erosa  M Volunteer 0 120
Sae Hui Lee Wiki Volunteer 0 90
Marielle Leo M Volunteer 0 180
Ryuhei  (Yu) Kawamoto M Volunteer 0 180
Sean Hartlieb DE 3 credits Psy 766 180 180
Sarah Cobb DE 3 credits Psy 498 180 180
Serina Oehler DE 3 credits Psy 498 180 180
Ernie Bedoy DE 3 credits Psy 498 180 180
Matt Roe Wiki 3 credits Psy 496 180 180
Claudia Villasante Wiki 3 credits Psy 496 180 180
Maryssa Nagata DE 3 credits Psy 496 180 180
Mason Kunha Wiki 3 credits Psy 496 180 180
Jenya Verenikina  DE Co-author 0 20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Grading Overview

Grades will be based upon two criteria: lab hours and quality of work.  Each of these will be marked out of 50, and then these will be added to obtain your final grade.  In addition, penalties will be applied to the final course grade if students miss meetings or fail to complete workshops.

Completing Required Lab Hours

You will receive a base grade of 50 for completing your required lab hours.  If you do not complete all of your required hours, you will receive a lower grade.  You will lose 1 point for each 1% of missing time.  For example, if you were taking a 3-credit course and were required to complete 180 hours but only completed 162 hours, this is a 10% loss, and so you would receive 40 points for your lab hours.  Although I will be very grateful if you work additional hours beyond the minimum required for this course, there will be no extra points for additional hours worked.

Quality of Work

You will receive a grade out of 50 in terms of the quality of your research assistance.  If you performed poorly, you might get 20 or 25 out of 50.  If you performed well, you might get 40 or more out of 50.  Thus, someone who did a moderately good job and completed all of their required hours would get 30/50 plus 50/50 = 80/100.  The most important qualities in a research assistant are work quality (primarily accuracy, the ability to follow instructions, and problem-solving skills) and a good attitude (primarily cooperativeness, interest in the material and willingness to accept feedback).  Quality is much more important than speed.

Penalties

Incomplete Workshops

All students are required to complete certain workshops (such as library workshops, writing workshops, and workshops on Excel and PowerPoint).  If students do not complete the specified workshops as required, they will lose 1% off their final course grade. Contact Dr. Barchard if you think it will be impossible to complete one of the required workshops.

Late Poster Assignments

In order to ensure that students make continuous progress on their posters and receive as much feedback as possible, teams will complete a series of assignments, each of which has specific requirements.  Unless there is a very good reason for missing one of these deadlines, late assignments will result in penalties of 1% per week, which will reduce students’ final course grade. For example, if an assignment is 1 – 7 days late, the final course grade is reduced by 1%; if the assignment is 8 – 14 days late, the final course grade is reduced by 2%.  Throughout the semester, there may be holidays during which the university is closed.  Students must plan ahead to ensure that assignments are still completed by the deadlines.

It is essential to recognize that there is a penalty if your poster assignment is late, but there is NO penalty if the assignment is done poorly.  If you are having trouble with the poster, the goal is to give you feedback and assistance.  Therefore, you MUST hand in your assignments on time, so we can get you the feedback you need.

Missed Lab Meetings or Missed Poster Meetings

Attendance at the Wednesday lab meetings and poster meetings is required.  If students miss meetings or are more than 5 minutes late and do not have an extremely good reason, they will lose 1% off their final course grade. 

The following are considered compelling reasons for missing a meeting: being out of town to attend a professional conference or because of a family emergency, and being sick.  If you are sick, please do not come to the meeting (not even to tell someone that you are sick). Instead, let the Lab Manager know afterwards: No one in the lab wants to get sick.  The following are not considered compelling reasons for missing a meeting: going to work, and being on holiday.  These will result in reductions in your course grade.  Students are not required to attend meetings that fall on a day when the university is closed: Students are welcome to meet that day or to schedule an extra meeting at a time when the university is open, but this is not required.  If they are out of town, students can attend project meetings by phone or Internet to avoid receiving a penalty, but they will usually not be able to attend lab meetings this way.  If you know in advance that you will be out of town, please notify the lab manager and Dr. Barchard as soon as possible, preferably by the end of the second week of the semester.  Also, if you do miss a lab meeting for any reason, you should make arrangements to complete the workshop or read the handout within 7 days.   If it will be impossible to attend lab meetings this semester, contact Dr. Barchard within the first week of classes to discuss individual arrangements.

Missed Project Meetings

Attendance at project meetings is also required.  However, your course grade will not be automatically reduced for failure to attend a meeting.  If you are able to make a solid contribution to the project even though you missed a meeting, this will not reduce your course grade.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


PSY 496 / 498
Grading Scheme

The following grading scheme will be used:

 

A

93 – 100

C

73 – 76

A-

90 – 92

C-

70 – 72

B+

87 – 89

D+

67 – 69

B

83 – 86

D

63 – 66

B-

80 – 82

D-

60 – 62

C+

77 – 79

F

Below 60

 





































PSY 496 / 498

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